He was eccentric, sure, but so were Tesla, Brahe, and Buckminster Fuller; his contributions to science fundamental, but so were Curie’s, Hubble’s and Newton’s. This raises the question: Why is Einstein the poster boy for genius?

"There’s no doubt that Einstein’s contributions to science were revolutionary. Before he came along, cosmology was a part of philosophy but, thanks to him, it’s become a branch of science, tasked with no less than a mathematical history and evolution of the Universe. Einstein’s work also led to the discovery of exotic physical phenomena such as black holes, gravitational waves, quantum entanglement, the Big Bang, and the Higgs boson. But despite this formidable scientific legacy, Einstein’s fame owes something more to our culture’s obsession with celebrity."

Word of the day: 聪明一世,糊涂一时 (Chinese)

oupacademic:

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Forty-five years ago today, three American test pilots sat atop a Saturn V rocket, nervous but ready to jettison toward Earth’s only natural satellite. By week’s end, they’d beam back photos and video from 240,000 miles away.

To celebrate, here are a couple of treasure troves: The Motion Picture Preservation Lab has excellent archival footage of NASA’s Orbital program. The Smithsonian hosts an awesome collection facts, stories and images. And the archives at the Lunar and Planetary Institute certainly worth some investigation.

Inspired by the Classics: Atari’s “Asteroids” Ranks No. 1 with Mensa Members
In celebration of National Video Game day, we asked a selection of Mensa gamers to rank an assortment of 30 best-selling titles from favorite to least. For some, if it wasn’t broke, there was no need to fix it.
Embiggened version

Inspired by the Classics: Atari’s “Asteroids” Ranks No. 1 with Mensa Members

In celebration of National Video Game day, we asked a selection of Mensa gamers to rank an assortment of 30 best-selling titles from favorite to least. For some, if it wasn’t broke, there was no need to fix it.

Embiggened version

i-heart-histo:

Neuronly have eyes for you

Careful…those nucleoli are owl-ways watching.

i-heart-histo

Point: Hawking.

Point: Hawking.

In remembrance of the 70th anniversary of D-Day, we wanted to catalog some of the great work highlighting the dangerous and heroic military feat accomplished that fateful Tuesday in 1944.
To start: the International Business Times and The Guardian newspapers have uploaded incredible collections of then-and-now shots like the one pictured above. An absolute must-see.
The Google Cultural Institute put together an exhibit on the Normandy landings including preserved copies of FDR’s D-Day prayer, the Military Conclusions of the Teheran Conference, and top secret progress reports from President Eisenhower to General Marshal.
Dassault Systèmes has recreated the Landings in an interactive and immersive virtual-reality experience in an attempt to preserve, with historical accuracy, the technological innovations of WWII.
And finally, NBC News has the heartwarming video of a 93-year-old veteran parachuting onto Utah Beach.
Photo Credit: Popperfoto/Getty and Peter Macdiarmid/Getty

In remembrance of the 70th anniversary of D-Day, we wanted to catalog some of the great work highlighting the dangerous and heroic military feat accomplished that fateful Tuesday in 1944.

To start: the International Business Times and The Guardian newspapers have uploaded incredible collections of then-and-now shots like the one pictured above. An absolute must-see.

The Google Cultural Institute put together an exhibit on the Normandy landings including preserved copies of FDR’s D-Day prayer, the Military Conclusions of the Teheran Conference, and top secret progress reports from President Eisenhower to General Marshal.

Dassault Systèmes has recreated the Landings in an interactive and immersive virtual-reality experience in an attempt to preserve, with historical accuracy, the technological innovations of WWII.

And finally, NBC News has the heartwarming video of a 93-year-old veteran parachuting onto Utah Beach.

Photo Credit: Popperfoto/Getty and Peter Macdiarmid/Getty

On this day in 1965, Gemini IV launches from Cape Kennedy Air Force Station, Florida, on a quest to complete the United States’ first multi-day space flight.
Pictured here, Astronaut Ed White floats listlessly in space, performing the first American EVA. He and fellow astronaut James McDivitt would go on to orbit the Earth for 4 Days, 1 hour, 56 min and 12 seconds before returning to the planet’s surface.

On this day in 1965, Gemini IV launches from Cape Kennedy Air Force Station, Florida, on a quest to complete the United States’ first multi-day space flight.

Pictured here, Astronaut Ed White floats listlessly in space, performing the first American EVA. He and fellow astronaut James McDivitt would go on to orbit the Earth for 4 Days, 1 hour, 56 min and 12 seconds before returning to the planet’s surface.

A First for NASA’s IRIS: Observing a Gigantic Eruption of Solar Material
NASA’s Interface Region Imaging Spectrography, which was launched last June, observed its first coronal mass ejection earlier this month. And the images it returned, are incredible.
"IRIS must commit to pointing at certain areas of the sun at least a day in advance, so catching a CME in the act involves some educated guesses and a little bit of luck. The field of view for this imagery is about five Earths wide and about seven-and-a-half Earths tall."Continue Reading

A First for NASA’s IRIS: Observing a Gigantic Eruption of Solar Material

NASA’s Interface Region Imaging Spectrography, which was launched last June, observed its first coronal mass ejection earlier this month. And the images it returned, are incredible.

"IRIS must commit to pointing at certain areas of the sun at least a day in advance, so catching a CME in the act involves some educated guesses and a little bit of luck. The field of view for this imagery is about five Earths wide and about seven-and-a-half Earths tall."

Continue Reading