Here, we see the most detailed true-color image of the entire Earth ever captured. Behold, our Blue Marble. On Earth Day, and when looking at this photo, it’s easy to remember the planet is awash with oceans, trees deserts, marshes, plains, and tundras, all teeming with life dependent on the planet’s finite resources.It’s the other 364 days when we tend to forget. When we’re too tired to sort the recycling. When we’d rather crank the A/C than rely on the breeze through open windows. When we waste, overuse, and under-appreciate.Instead of forgetting, let’s remember: We share this planet; we share this home. Our Home. This year and every year, let’s reward our Mother Earth’s love. Every tiny step is one step closer.Happy Earth Day.Photo Credit: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Here, we see the most detailed true-color image of the entire Earth ever captured. Behold, our Blue Marble. On Earth Day, and when looking at this photo, it’s easy to remember the planet is awash with oceans, trees deserts, marshes, plains, and tundras, all teeming with life dependent on the planet’s finite resources.

It’s the other 364 days when we tend to forget. When we’re too tired to sort the recycling. When we’d rather crank the A/C than rely on the breeze through open windows. When we waste, overuse, and under-appreciate.

Instead of forgetting, let’s remember: We share this planet; we share this home. Our Home. This year and every year, let’s reward our Mother Earth’s love. Every tiny step is one step closer.

Happy Earth Day.

Photo Credit: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Researchers have long suspected humans aren’t the only species capable of calculating mathematical functions — a new study appears to confirm that suspicion.
Neurobiologist Margaret Livingstone leads a research team that has successfully trained three rhesus macaques to identify symbols representing the numbers zero to 25 and perform calculations to receive rewards.
"We found that they could combine symbolically represented magnitudes, and they transferred this ability to a novel symbol set, indicating that they were performing a calculation, not just memorizing the value of each combination."
Continue Reading Photo Credit: Margaret S. Livingstone

Researchers have long suspected humans aren’t the only species capable of calculating mathematical functions — a new study appears to confirm that suspicion.

Neurobiologist Margaret Livingstone leads a research team that has successfully trained three rhesus macaques to identify symbols representing the numbers zero to 25 and perform calculations to receive rewards.

"We found that they could combine symbolically represented magnitudes, and they transferred this ability to a novel symbol set, indicating that they were performing a calculation, not just memorizing the value of each combination."

Continue Reading
Photo Credit: Margaret S. Livingstone

Biologists have discovered four species of Brazilian insects in which the females possess a penis — the first documented instance in the animal kingdom.

And talk about romance: “But when it’s time to mate, the female mounts the male and penetrates his vagina-like opening using her gynosome — the term used to designate her female-penis. This mating behavior lasts for an impressive 40 to 70 hours, thanks to the female’s inflatable, spiny penis that anchors itself to the male’s internal tissues.”

Continue Reading
Photo Credit: Current Biology/Yoshizawa et al.

Biomedical engineers develop lab-grown muscle capable of self-healing inside an animal
"The muscle we have made represents an important advance for the field," said Nenad Bursac, associate professor of biomedical engineering at Duke. "It’s the first time engineered muscle has been created that contracts as strongly as native neonatal skeletal muscle."
Continue Reading

Biomedical engineers develop lab-grown muscle capable of self-healing inside an animal

"The muscle we have made represents an important advance for the field," said Nenad Bursac, associate professor of biomedical engineering at Duke. "It’s the first time engineered muscle has been created that contracts as strongly as native neonatal skeletal muscle."

Continue Reading

Using data obtained by the Fermi Telescope, astrophysicists may have found the first clear, direct evidence of dark matter in our own galaxy.
"The key feature of this hot spot of emissions is that it covers a very large area; it extends about 6,500 light years in all directions from the galaxy’s central black hole. That’s too far from the galactic bulge for there to be many stars present, and thus many normal source of gamma rays. So at the moment, there’s no mundane process we know about that could be producing these gamma rays."
Continue ReadingFull Paper (Photo Credit: Daylan et al)

Using data obtained by the Fermi Telescope, astrophysicists may have found the first clear, direct evidence of dark matter in our own galaxy.

"The key feature of this hot spot of emissions is that it covers a very large area; it extends about 6,500 light years in all directions from the galaxy’s central black hole. That’s too far from the galactic bulge for there to be many stars present, and thus many normal source of gamma rays. So at the moment, there’s no mundane process we know about that could be producing these gamma rays."

Continue Reading
Full Paper
(Photo Credit: Daylan et al)

On this day in 1973, Mensan and Motorola employee Martin Cooper placed the world’s first mobile phone call.
Using a prototype of what would later become the Motorola DynaTAC 8000x, Marty dialed the headquarters of Bell Labs in New Jersey from midtown Manhattan.
Cisco’s Steve Wildstrom caught up with Martin in late 2012 to discuss how the mobile phone and market have changed since his historic call. Turns out, he’s not so much a fan of the app.
"The real revolution in cell phones happened with the introduction of a phone where you could talk to other people and perhaps text as well. All these other things turn out to be conveniences but not nearly as revolutionary as just connecting people."
Continue Reading Photo: Eric Risberg/AP

On this day in 1973, Mensan and Motorola employee Martin Cooper placed the world’s first mobile phone call.

Using a prototype of what would later become the Motorola DynaTAC 8000x, Marty dialed the headquarters of Bell Labs in New Jersey from midtown Manhattan.

Cisco’s Steve Wildstrom caught up with Martin in late 2012 to discuss how the mobile phone and market have changed since his historic call. Turns out, he’s not so much a fan of the app.

"The real revolution in cell phones happened with the introduction of a phone where you could talk to other people and perhaps text as well. All these other things turn out to be conveniences but not nearly as revolutionary as just connecting people."

Continue Reading
Photo: Eric Risberg/AP

For centuries, observers of the majestic animals have wondered, “Why do zebras have stripes?” Now, we may have an answer.
New research strongly suggests that zebras’ stripes are an evolutionary mechanism developed to deter parasitic flies. The idea that flies have an aversion to the stripes dates back to the early 1930s.
"Conversely, there is no consistent support for camouflage, predator avoidance, heat management or social interaction hypotheses. Susceptibility to ectoparasite attack is discussed in relation to short coat hair, disease transmission and blood loss."
Continue Reading

For centuries, observers of the majestic animals have wondered, “Why do zebras have stripes?” Now, we may have an answer.

New research strongly suggests that zebras’ stripes are an evolutionary mechanism developed to deter parasitic flies. The idea that flies have an aversion to the stripes dates back to the early 1930s.

"Conversely, there is no consistent support for camouflage, predator avoidance, heat management or social interaction hypotheses. Susceptibility to ectoparasite attack is discussed in relation to short coat hair, disease transmission and blood loss."

Continue Reading

3D Insect Flight: Footage Captured From Inside A Fly
Using particle accelerator to record high-speed X-rays, researchers at Oxford university offer a remarkable view of the blowfly’s wingbeat. Fifty times quicker than a blink of a human eye, each beat is controlled by numerous tiny steering muscles.
This three-dimensional cutaway depicts the steering muscles, looking out toward the wing hinge. With this unprecedented look at the mechanics, researchers can measure the strains for each individual fly at every stage of the wingbeat.
Read More: http://ow.ly/uZNsb Full Paper: http://ow.ly/uZOvr

3D Insect Flight: Footage Captured From Inside A Fly

Using particle accelerator to record high-speed X-rays, researchers at Oxford university offer a remarkable view of the blowfly’s wingbeat. Fifty times quicker than a blink of a human eye, each beat is controlled by numerous tiny steering muscles.

This three-dimensional cutaway depicts the steering muscles, looking out toward the wing hinge. With this unprecedented look at the mechanics, researchers can measure the strains for each individual fly at every stage of the wingbeat.

Read More: http://ow.ly/uZNsb
Full Paper: http://ow.ly/uZOvr

A flawless compendium of flaws: The Illustrated Book of Bad Arguments
"The illustrations are partly inspired by allegories such as Orwell’s Animal Farm and partly by the humorous nonsense of works such as Lewis Carroll’s stories and poems.
Unlike such works, there isn’t a narrative that ties them together; they are discrete scenes, connected only through style and theme, which better affords adaptability and reuse. Each fallacy has just one page of exposition, and so the terseness of the prose is intentional.”
https://bookofbadarguments.com/

A flawless compendium of flaws: The Illustrated Book of Bad Arguments

"The illustrations are partly inspired by allegories such as Orwell’s Animal Farm and partly by the humorous nonsense of works such as Lewis Carroll’s stories and poems.

Unlike such works, there isn’t a narrative that ties them together; they are discrete scenes, connected only through style and theme, which better affords adaptability and reuse. Each fallacy has just one page of exposition, and so the terseness of the prose is intentional.”

https://bookofbadarguments.com/

On this 25th birthday of the Internet, a full spread:
There’s the full text of Tim Berners-Lee’s ‘vague, but exciting’ proposal for the Web: http://info.cern.ch/Proposal.html (pictured above).
Twenty-five years of the Pew Research Institute’s Internet-related data: http://ow.ly/uvzVF.
And there’s CNET’s interview with the inventor himself — looking back at 25 years of success and how we’ll use the Internet in the future to overcome cultural barriers, thwart government snooping and progress society: http://ow.ly/uvAP7.

On this 25th birthday of the Internet, a full spread:

There’s the full text of Tim Berners-Lee’s ‘vague, but exciting’ proposal for the Web: http://info.cern.ch/Proposal.html (pictured above).

Twenty-five years of the Pew Research Institute’s Internet-related data: http://ow.ly/uvzVF.

And there’s CNET’s interview with the inventor himself — looking back at 25 years of success and how we’ll use the Internet in the future to overcome cultural barriers, thwart government snooping and progress society: http://ow.ly/uvAP7.