Get Up Close With The Portuguese Man-of-War
"The Portuguese man-of-war—a colonial organism related to the jellyfish—is infamous for its painful sting, but one photographer finds the beauty inside this animal’s dangerous embrace. For nearly two years, retired U.S. Navy combat photographer Aaron Ansarov has collected and photographed man-of-wars that wash up on a local Florida beach."
Watch: Stunning Video: The Portuguese Man-of-War Up Close

Get Up Close With The Portuguese Man-of-War

"The Portuguese man-of-war—a colonial organism related to the jellyfish—is infamous for its painful sting, but one photographer finds the beauty inside this animal’s dangerous embrace. For nearly two years, retired U.S. Navy combat photographer Aaron Ansarov has collected and photographed man-of-wars that wash up on a local Florida beach."

Watch: Stunning Video: The Portuguese Man-of-War Up Close

todaysdocument:

A machine that really adds up

This drawing by William Seward Burroughs is from his first patent application for a calculating machine—an important step toward the modern computer. A sometime clerk, box maker, and mechanic, Burroughs resolved to invent a machine that could add automatically and print the result. He was issued the patent on August 21, 1888.

Drawing for a Calculating Machine, 08/21/1888

via DocsTeach

(Source: research.archives.gov)

Mensan’s Top-10 Favorite Children’s Books, Ranked
We asked our members to rank their childhood favorites from a list of best sellers built in partnership with Half Price Books.
Which book served as your go-to retreat in pages as a kid?
Embiggened Version

Mensan’s Top-10 Favorite Children’s Books, Ranked

We asked our members to rank their childhood favorites from a list of best sellers built in partnership with Half Price Books.

Which book served as your go-to retreat in pages as a kid?

Embiggened Version

txchnologist:

New Technique Lets Scientists See Through Whole Organisms

by Michael Keller

Seeing is believing when it comes to understanding how organisms work. For biologists trying to learn about what’s going on inside a body, one of the biggest obstacles is not being able to put their eyeballs on a part or system without other objects getting in the way. The answer is usually going in with one invasive tool or another, which ends up damaging or destroying the thing they’re trying to investigate. 

Now California Institute of Technology scientists say they have improved upon a solution to clearing up the picture. The technique builds on work that garnered widespread attention last year. In that effort, assistant professor of biology Viviana Gradinaru and her team used detergent and a polymer to make a rodent brain transparent for study in unprecedented detail. 

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Artist aims to combat stigmatization of mental illness by comparing it to other chronic diseases
"All the comments in this six-panel comic are things that you should think quietly to yourself, but never say aloud. In an ideal world, you would not be thinking these thoughts at all, but I’ll settle for self-editing as a sign of progress."
Continue Reading

Artist aims to combat stigmatization of mental illness by comparing it to other chronic diseases

"All the comments in this six-panel comic are things that you should think quietly to yourself, but never say aloud. In an ideal world, you would not be thinking these thoughts at all, but I’ll settle for self-editing as a sign of progress."

Continue Reading

Australian National University Physicists Create a Tractor Beam on Water
"The team, led by Dr Horst Punzmann, discovered they can control water flow patterns with simple wave generators, enabling them to move floating objects at will. The team also experimented with different shaped plungers to generate different swirling flow patterns."
Continue Reading

Australian National University Physicists Create a Tractor Beam on Water

"The team, led by Dr Horst Punzmann, discovered they can control water flow patterns with simple wave generators, enabling them to move floating objects at will. The team also experimented with different shaped plungers to generate different swirling flow patterns."

Continue Reading

lindahall:

John Venn - Scientist of the Day

John Venn, an English philosopher, was born Aug. 4, 1834. In 1880, Venn introduced a new logical device that came to be known as a Venn diagram. Venn diagrams attempt to give visual form to such logical statements as “all A is B” or “some B is C” or “no C is D”. By representing such sets as circles that intersect, lie within, or remain separate from other circles, Venn not only allowed the logician to add a visual dimension to an argument, but also provided a new tool for helping to solve logic problems. Similar diagrams can be found in the earlier work of Gottfried Leibniz and Leonhard Euler—indeed, Venn always referred to them as “Eulerian circles”—but because of his systematic development of the devices, they have been known since Venn’s death as Venn diagrams. They were first used by Venn in a paper in the London, Edinburgh, and Dublin Philosophical Magazine, 1880, which we have in the Library’s serials collection.

If you are not familiar with Venn diagrams, you may look them up on Wikipedia, but as a visual introduction, may we recommend a memorial stained glass window at Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge (see first image above). Stained-glass is a wonderful but underused medium for commemorating scientists and their discoveries. We know of only a dozen or so windows with a scientific theme, and we will try to introduce more of them on future anniversary occasions.

The second image is from Venn’s original 1880 paper, and so marks the debut of Venn diagrams in print.

Dr. William B. Ashworth, Jr., Consultant for the History of Science, Linda Hall Library and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Missouri-Kansas City

Digital Memory Illustration

A Bulletin exclusive: Plugged in — A car crash stole his memory. Twitter gave it back.

Researchers discover cool-burning flames in space that could lead to better engines here on Earth
"The discovery was made during a series of experiments on the International Space Station by a team led by Forman Williams, a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at the University of California, San Diego. Researchers detailed their findings last month in the journal Microgravity Science and Technology." “We observed something that we didn’t think could exist,” Williams said.
Continue Reading

Researchers discover cool-burning flames in space that could lead to better engines here on Earth

"The discovery was made during a series of experiments on the International Space Station by a team led by Forman Williams, a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at the University of California, San Diego. Researchers detailed their findings last month in the journal Microgravity Science and Technology."

“We observed something that we didn’t think could exist,” Williams said.

Continue Reading

wolframalpha:

Just how much Jazzercise would it take to shake off the calories from 100 Taco Bell tacos? http://wolfr.am/1kjq1rK 

The only thing Wolfram Alpha cannot compute is how much we love their Tumblr account.

wolframalpha:

Just how much Jazzercise would it take to shake off the calories from 100 Taco Bell tacos?

The only thing Wolfram Alpha cannot compute is how much we love their Tumblr account.