wolframalpha:

Just how much Jazzercise would it take to shake off the calories from 100 Taco Bell tacos? http://wolfr.am/1kjq1rK 

The only thing Wolfram Alpha cannot compute is how much we love their Tumblr account.

wolframalpha:

Just how much Jazzercise would it take to shake off the calories from 100 Taco Bell tacos?

The only thing Wolfram Alpha cannot compute is how much we love their Tumblr account.

10/10. Would read again.
Credit: @reddit user /u/CapnFancyPants

10/10. Would read again.

Credit: @reddit user /u/CapnFancyPants

spaceplasma:

Tokamaks: the future of fusion energy

Fusion is the energy that powers our Sun and other stars.  It has been a goal of scientists around the world to harness this process by which the stars “burn” hydrogen into helium (i.e. nuclear fusion) for energy production on Earth since it was discovered in the 1940′s.

Nuclear fusion is the process by which light nuclei fuse together to create a single, heavier nucleus and release energy.  Given the correct conditions (such as those found in plasma), nuclei of light elements can smash into each other with enough energy to undergo fusion. The “easiest” (most energetically favorable) fusion reaction occurs between the hydrogen isotopes deuterium and tritium.  When the nucleus of a deuterium atom crashes into the nucleus of a tritium atom with sufficient energy, a fusion reaction occurs and a huge amount of energy is released, 17.6 million electron volts to be exact. 

Why fusion? To put this in terms of energy that we all experience; fusion generates more energy per reaction than any other energy source.  A single gram of deuterium/tritium fusion fuel can generate 350 million kJ of energy, nearly 10 million times more energy than from the same amount of fossil fuel!

Fusion power has the potential to provide sufficient energy to satisfy mounting demand, and to do so sustainably, with a relatively small impact on the environment. Nuclear fusion has many potential attractions. Firstly, its hydrogen isotope fuels are relatively abundant – one of the necessary isotopes, deuterium, can be extracted from seawater, while the other fuel, tritium, would be bred from a lithium blanket using neutrons produced in the fusion reaction itself. Furthermore, a fusion reactor would produce virtually no CO2 or atmospheric pollutants, and its other radioactive waste products would be very short-lived compared to those produced by conventional nuclear reactors.

Fusion reactions require so much energy that they must occur with the hydrogen isotopes in this plasma state. Plasma makes up all of the stars, and is the most common form of matter in the visible universe. Since plasmas are made of charged particles every particle can interact with every other particle, even over very long distances. The fact that 99% of the universe is made of plasmas makes studying them very important if we are to understand how the universe works.

How do we create fusion in a laboratory? This is where tokamaks come in. In order for nuclear fusion to occur, the nuclei inside of the plasma must first be extremely hot, like in a star. Unfortunately, no material on Earth can withstand these temperatures so in order to contain a plasma with such high temperatures, we have to be creative. One clever solution is to create a magnetic “bottle” using large magnet coils to capture the plasma and suspend it away from the container’s surfaces. The plasma follows along the magnetic field, suspended away from the walls. This complex combination of magnets used to confine the plasma and the chamber where the plasma is held is known as a tokamak. Tokamaks have a toroidal shape (i.e. they are shaped like a donut) so they have no open ends for plasma to escape. Tokamaks, like the ASDEX Upgrade (pictured above), create and contain the hottest materials in the solar system. The aim of ASDEX Upgrade, the “Axially Symmetric Divertor Experiment”, is to prepare the physics base for ITER.

ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and Latin for “the way” or “the road”) is an international nuclear fusion research and engineering project, which is currently building the world’s largest experimental tokamak nuclear fusion reactor. The ITER project aims to make the long-awaited transition from experimental studies of plasma physics to full-scale electricity-producing fusion power plants.

Further readings:

(via sagansense)

"Jelly Roll," "Fandango De Pokum," And Other Historical Slang Terms For Coitus From 1351 Through Today
"Linguist Jonathon Green, author of Green’s Dictionary of Slang and other essential books on slang, created two charts of genitalia slang, one for penis and one for vagina. Now he’s done the same with three interactive charts showing the first appearance of English-language slang terms for sexual intercourse generally, oral sex and anal intercourse, and orgasms, bodily fluids, and contraception. The basic intercourse chart, which you can see a snippet from above, stretches back to 1351."
Continue Reading

"Jelly Roll," "Fandango De Pokum," And Other Historical Slang Terms For Coitus From 1351 Through Today

"Linguist Jonathon Green, author of Green’s Dictionary of Slang and other essential books on slang, created two charts of genitalia slang, one for penis and one for vagina. Now he’s done the same with three interactive charts showing the first appearance of English-language slang terms for sexual intercourse generally, oral sex and anal intercourse, and orgasms, bodily fluids, and contraception. The basic intercourse chart, which you can see a snippet from above, stretches back to 1351."

Continue Reading

He was eccentric, sure, but so were Tesla, Brahe, and Buckminster Fuller; his contributions to science fundamental, but so were Curie’s, Hubble’s and Newton’s. This raises the question: Why is Einstein the poster boy for genius?

"There’s no doubt that Einstein’s contributions to science were revolutionary. Before he came along, cosmology was a part of philosophy but, thanks to him, it’s become a branch of science, tasked with no less than a mathematical history and evolution of the Universe. Einstein’s work also led to the discovery of exotic physical phenomena such as black holes, gravitational waves, quantum entanglement, the Big Bang, and the Higgs boson. But despite this formidable scientific legacy, Einstein’s fame owes something more to our culture’s obsession with celebrity."

Word of the day: 聪明一世,糊涂一时 (Chinese)

oupacademic:

image

Forty-five years ago today, three American test pilots sat atop a Saturn V rocket, nervous but ready to jettison toward Earth’s only natural satellite. By week’s end, they’d beam back photos and video from 240,000 miles away.

To celebrate, here are a couple of treasure troves: The Motion Picture Preservation Lab has excellent archival footage of NASA’s Orbital program. The Smithsonian hosts an awesome collection facts, stories and images. And the archives at the Lunar and Planetary Institute certainly worth some investigation.

Inspired by the Classics: Atari’s “Asteroids” Ranks No. 1 with Mensa Members
In celebration of National Video Game day, we asked a selection of Mensa gamers to rank an assortment of 30 best-selling titles from favorite to least. For some, if it wasn’t broke, there was no need to fix it.
Embiggened version

Inspired by the Classics: Atari’s “Asteroids” Ranks No. 1 with Mensa Members

In celebration of National Video Game day, we asked a selection of Mensa gamers to rank an assortment of 30 best-selling titles from favorite to least. For some, if it wasn’t broke, there was no need to fix it.

Embiggened version

i-heart-histo:

Neuronly have eyes for you

Careful…those nucleoli are owl-ways watching.

i-heart-histo

Point: Hawking.

Point: Hawking.